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About

make-plots reads histogram files in a simple text format and converts them into PostScript or PDF files. This is done by creating a LaTeX file and running latex, dvips, and maybe ps2pdf.

Usage

To run make-plots call

 make-plots [options] file.dat [file2.dat ...]

All available options can be listed by running

 make-plots --help

Configuration files

make-plots typically takes the plotting instructions and settings from the input ascii files as described in the "Input Format" chapter. It is also possible though to pass a global configuration file to make-plots (cf. --help) which allows to specify/overwrite settings for certain plots or histograms in a plot on top of what the input files specify. This could be useful if the ascii files are generated automatically (e.g. with rivet-mkhtml or compare-histos) and you still want to apply custom plotting options.

An example for this looks like:

# BEGIN PLOT figures/MC_WJETS/W_mass.dat
XMin=60.0
XMax=100.0
LegendXPos=0.65
# END PLOT

.*myLOrun.aida/D0_2008_S7554427/d01-x01-y01::Scale=1.0

Here first the options in the PLOT section of a specific ascii file are being amended/overwritten. The second part shows how to overwrite the Scale property of one specific histogram line using the ID of the histogram.

Input Format

The ascii files which can be read by make-plots are divided into sections. There are four types of sections which are called PLOT, HISTOGRAM, FUNCTION, and SPECIAL. Every file must contain exactly one PLOT section and at least one section of the other three types. There may be multiple HISTOGRAM, FUNCTION, and SPECIAL sections.

Empty lines and lines starting with # are ignored, except for the section delimiters described below.

PLOT

The PLOT section starts with

# BEGIN PLOT

and ends with

# END PLOT

Every file must have exactly one PLOT section. In this section global parameters are specified, like the axis labels, the plot title, size, … An empty PLOT section is perfectly legal, though.

In this section the following parameters can be set:

Titles, Labels

Title=<title>

The title of the plot.

XLabel=<label>
YLabel=<label>
ZLabel=<label>

Axis labels for the x-, y-, and z-axis.

XLabelSep=<distance>
YLabelSep=<distance>
ZLabelSep=<distance>

Distance between the axis label and the plot in units of \labelsep.

XMajorTickMarks=<last_digit>
YMajorTickMarks=<last_digit>
ZMajorTickMarks=<last_digit>
XMinorTickMarks=<nticks>
YMinorTickMarks=<nticks>
ZMinorTickMarks=<nticks>

make-plots tries to guess the distance between tickmarks automatically. If you are not satisfied with its result, you can override this by setting <last_digit> to 1, 2, 5, or 10, and <nticks> to the number of minor ticks you like. Note: These options are not available for logarithmic axes.

XTwosidedTicks=<0|1>
YTwosidedTicks=<0|1>

Draw tickmarks also on the upper and/or right side of the plot.

XCustomMajorTicks=<list>
YCustomMajorTicks=<list>
ZCustomMajorTicks=<list>

To specify major ticks at arbitrary positions and/or with arbitrary labels. <list> is a whitespace-separated list of format value1 <spaces_or_tabs> label1 <spaces_or_tabs> value2 <spaces_or_tabs> label2 ....

TODO: allow use of YAML-style list syntax to clarify delimiters?

XCustomMinorTicks=<list>
YCustomMinorTicks=<list>
ZCustomMinorTicks=<list>

To specify minor ticks at arbitrary positions. <list> is a tab separated list of format value1 <tab> value2 <tab> value3 ....

PlotXTickLabels=<0|1>
RatioPlotTickLabels=<0|1>

Disable/enable plotting of the tick labels in the plot and ratio plot (useful if multiple plots are to be combined manually later).

Axes

LogX=<0|1>
LogY=<0|1>
LogZ=<0|1>

Use a logarithmic x-, y-, or z-axis. Default is linear.

XMin=<value>
XMax=<value>
YMin=<value>
YMax=<value>
ZMin=<value>
ZMax=<value>
FullRange=<0|1>
ShowZero=<0|1>

Specify the plot range. By default the range is chosen such that all data is visible in linear plots, and the zero is visible. ShowZero=0 suppresses plotting the zero in linear plots and thus zooms into the actual y-value range of the distribution. In logarithmic plots the automatic choice of YMin is limited to be not smaller than 2e-4*YMax, but manually you can specify any value. FullRange=1 also overrides the 2e-4*YMax limit and plots the full range in y.

Normalization, Rebinning

NormalizeToIntegral=<1|0>
NormalizeToSum=<1|0>
Scale=<factor>

Normalize all histograms to their integral, to their sum of entries, or scale them by some arbitrary factor. Normalization and scale options in the PLOT section override the corresponding option in the HISTOGRAM section. The scale factor is applied after normalization.

Rebin=<nbins>

Rebin all histograms in this plot. Syntax and functionality is the same as for the Rebin option in the HISTOGRAM section.

Sizes and Margins

PlotSize=<xsize,ysize>

Size in x and y direction of the plot. This can be specified in any unit LaTeX understands.

LeftMargin=<size>
RightMargin=<size>
TopMargin=<size>
BottomMargin=<size>

Distance between the plot and the paper edge.

FrameColor=<color>

Background color for the margin around the plot.

Legends

Legend=<0|1>

Display a legend in the plot.

CustomLegend=<text>

Custom text that is added to the legend.

LegendXPos=<pos>
LegendYPos=<pos>

Position of the legend within the plot. Anchor point is the top left corner of the legend, so units typically range between 0.0 and 1.0.

LegendAlign=<align>

Horizontal alignment of the legend: LegendAlign=l is the default and will create a left-aligned legend, while LegendAlign=r is right-aligned with the keys on the right hand side.

LegendOnly=<list>

Whitespace separated list of IDs. These can be histograms or functions. The legend is only shown for the listed objects. Without this option, all plotted objects which have a title enter the legend. The legend titles are plotted in the given order, so there are cases in which it makes sense to use LegendOnly together with all histogram IDs. It is also possible to specify the legend order on an entry-by-entry basis using the LegendOrder=<int> setting for each histogram or function.

Plotting Options

DrawOnly=<list>

Whitespace separated list of histogram IDs. Only the histograms in this list are plotted, even if there are more histograms defined in the file. The histograms are plotted in the given order, so there are cases in which it makes sense to use DrawOnly together with all histogram IDs. This is especially useful for the Stack option. It is also possible to specify the plotting order on a histogram-by-histogram basis using the PlotOrder=<int> setting for each histogram.

Stack=<list>

Whitespace separated list of histogram IDs. The histograms will be added on top of each other. This is useful for example to compare data with background if the background has contributions from several histograms.

DrawSpecialFirst=<0|1>
DrawFunctionFirst=<0|1>

By default the SPECIAL and FUNCTION sections are plotted after the histograms. With these options you can override that behaviour.

ConnectGaps=<0|1>

If error bars are disabled and you want to bridge gaps in a histogram, you can set this parameter. By default it is off. Setting it in the PLOT section affects all histograms, but you can also set it in the HISTOGRAM section for individual histograms. The local setting overrides the global setting.

Comparison Plots

With the

RatioPlot=1
RatioPlotReference=<histogram_ID>

options you can create ratio plots for two or more histograms. Note that you must specify your reference data ID. This option is used by the compare-histos script.

RatioPlotMode=<default|deviation|datamc>

By default, the ratio plot displays MC/Data. You can switch to (MC-data)/uncertainty (deviation) or Data/MC (datamc) with this option.

In ratio plots the following additional options are available and work in a similar way as their regular counterparts:

RatioPlotYLabel=<label>
RatioPlotYMin=<value>
RatioPlotYMax=<value>
RatioPlotYSize=<size>
RatioPlotErrorBandColor=<color>

By default, the reference data is plotted using a yellow error band around the central value of the ratio plot. If you would rather have it plotted in the same style as in the main plot (e.g. with black errorbars), you can specify:

RatioPlotSameStyle=1

If you only want the ratio plot without showing the actual data distribution, you can switch off the main plot. This option implies RatioPlot=1:

MainPlot=0

Goodness of Fit

make-plots can calculate the goodness of fit between histograms and display the result in the legend. It is also possible to change the color of the margin around the plot depending on the GoF. This is useful to provide a quick overview when looking at many plots.

GofType=chi2

The type of GoF. The default is chi2 and currently that’s the only option.

GofReference=<histogram_ID>

specifies the reference histogram to be used for the GoF calculation. If this option is omitted, the fallback is RatioPlotReference.

The GoF calculation is activated by two options:

GofLegend=<0|1>
GofFrame=<histogram_ID>

GofLegend calculates the GoF for all histograms and displays the results in the legend. With GofFrame you can specify a single histogram for which the GoF result will be shown in the legend and used to assign a color to the plot margins. Note that FrameColor overrides the color choice for the margin. You can use

GofFrameColor=<colorthresholds>

to specify the thresholds for the frame color. This option takes a list of <threshold>:<color> pairs, separated by whitespace. The default is GofFrameColor=0:green 3:yellow 6:red!70. Again, if you use FrameColor, this option is disabled.

Color Palettes for 2-dim Plots

With the option ColorSeries you can define a custom color palette for 2-dimensional plots. The syntax is the same as for the \definecolorseries command in the xcolor LaTeX package after the color series name, i.e. {core-model}{method}[begin-model]{begin-spec}[end-model]{end-spec}. For more information you can consult the xcolor documentation. Here is an example:

ColorSeries={rgb}{last}[rgb]{1,0.97,0.94}[rgb]{0.6,0.0,0.05}

HISTOGRAM

The HISTOGRAM section starts with

# BEGIN HISTOGRAM <ID>

and ends with

# END HISTOGRAM

There can be more than one HISTOGRAM section in a file. Histograms are identified by <ID> which can be any string not containing whitespace.

Data Format

Lines starting with a number (positive or negative) are interpreted as data. Each line specifies one bin. The fields in each line must be separated by tabs, not spaces (this needs to be fixes some day). For 1-dimensional histograms the format can be

<lowerbinedge>  <upperbinedge>  <value>  <error>
<lowerbinedge>  <upperbinedge>  <value>  <minuserror>  <pluserror>

2-dimensional histograms are supported, too. They are plotted as colormap (errors are ignored) and specified as

<lowerxbinedge>  <upperxbinedge>  <lowerybinedge>  <upperybinedge>  <value>  <error>

Titles

Title=<title>

Title of the histogram. This is used for the legend.

Linestyles

LineStyle=<style>

Any linestyle that is understood by the LaTeX pstricks package, e.g. solid, dotted, dashed, none, as well as a special dashdotted (or dotdashed) linestyle which does what you might expect.

LineColor=<color>

Color of the line. Default is black, but any color that pstricks understands can be used, including constructions like red!70!blue!20 (for mixing colors), {[rgb]{0.8,0,0.7}} (for RGB-colors), {[wave]{580}} (for wavelengths in nm), LineColor={[cmyk]{1,1,0,0}} for CMYK-colors, or [hsb]{0.5,1,1} for HSB-colors.

LineOpacity=<opacity>

Set the opacity of the line. Default is 1.0. This might not work for ps output.

LineWidth=<width>

Width of the line.

LineDash=<dashstyle>

If LineStyle is set to dashed, you can specify the dash style with this option. Anything that is understood by pstrick’s dash=... option is valid. An example for a dash-dotted line is LineDash=3pt 3pt .8pt 3pt. You can use LineStyle=dashdotted or LineStyle=dotdashed as an abbreviation for LineStyle=dashed with LineDash=3pt 3pt .8pt 3pt.

ConnectBins=<0|1>

Choose whether to connect adjacent bins' horizontal lines together by a vertical line on the bin edge. This is enabled by default, but you may wish to disable it when plotting reference data with error bars and point markers.

ConnectGaps=<0|1>

If ConnectBins is enabled and you want to bridge gaps in a histogram, you can set this parameter. By default it is off. Setting it in the PLOT section affects all histograms, but you can also set it in the HISTOGRAM section for individual histograms. The local setting overrides the global setting.

SmoothLine=<0|1>

Draw a smooth curve rather than a histogram

Fillstyles

FillStyle=<style>
FillColor=<color>

To fill the area below a histogram, set FillStyle and FillColor to something pstricks understands. Examples for the style are solid or vlines. See LineColor for examples of color definitions.

FillOpacity=<opacity>

Set the opacity of the solid fillcolor. Default is 1.0. This might not work for ps output.

HatchColor=<color>

The color of a hatch pattern used for filling the area below a histogram. This is used for example when you use vlines as style.

Data Points

ErrorBars=<0|1>

Turn on error bars.

ErrorBands=<0|1>
ErrorBandColor=<color>

Turn on error bands and set their color (see LineColor for a description of color definitions).

ErrorBandOpacity=<opacity>

Set the opacity of the error band. Default is 1.0. This might not work for ps output.

PolyMarker=<dotstyle>

The marker style of the points. Any dot style which is understood by pstricks is valid, e.g. *, o, triangle, diamond, …

DotSize=<size>
DotScale=<factor>

The size of the markers. With DotSize you can specify the absolute size, e.g. in units of pt, while DotScale is a relative measure with respect to the default size.

Normalization, Rebinning

NormalizeToIntegral=<1|0>
NormalizeToSum=<1|0>
Scale=<factor>

Normalize the histogram to the integral, to the sum of entries, or scale it by some arbitrary factor. If normalization and a scale factor are given, the scale factor is applied after normalization. This is useful for stacking histograms when the ratios are known.

Rebin=<nbins>
ErrorType=<stat|env>

Rebin the histogram. Starting with the lowest bin <nbins> bins are combined into a new bin. If the number of bins in the histogram is not a multiple of <nbins>, the remaining bins at the upper histogram end are silently ignored (i.e. if the original histogram has 10 bins and <nbins> is 3, the plotted histogram shows three bins combining the bins 1—9 of the original histogram). The treatment of the errors is determined by the given ErrorType: stat (default) assumes the errors are of statistical nature and combines them in quadrature sum, while env allows to treat errors as envelope of various uncertainty runs which are combined linearly.

FUNCTION

make-plots can draw arbitrary functions. These functions are defined as python code sniplets which are evaluated by make-plots. The code sniplet must come after all other options in a FUNCTION section and are preceded by Code= on a single line. An example FUNCTION section might look like this:

# BEGIN FUNCTION f_cc
LineColor=red
Code=
p0=16.4
p1=1.25
p2=0.9832
from scipy.special import erf
x-=0.5
if x<=0:
    return 0
else:
    return .5*p2*(1.+erf( (x-p0)/sqrt(x*p1) ))
# END FUNCTION

Common Options with HISTOGRAM

The following options have the same meaning as in the HISTOGRAM section:

Title=<title>
LineStyle=<style>
LineColor=<color>
LineWidth=<width>
LineDash=<dashstyle>
FillStyle=<style>
FillColor=<color>
HatchColor=<color>

Function Range

You can limit the plot range of functions by specifying

XMin=<value>
XMax=<value>

SPECIAL

The SPECIAL sections are used to include any custom pstricks code. This is useful for drawing arrows and lines, put text at any position into the plot, etc. The default coordinate system is defined to be (0,0) at the lower left and (1,1) at the upper right corner of the plot. By putting the \physicscoor command in front of a coordinate pair, these coordinates are interpreted not in the pstricks coordinate system, but in the physics coordinate system of the plot, which is useful e.g. for marking cut values in a plot. Similar \physicsxcoor and \physicsycoor commands exist which will only treat the x or y coordinate respectively as being in physics units.

Hint: If you want to clip your SPECIAL code to the plot area, you can use

\psclip{\psframe[linewidth=0, linestyle=none](0,0)(1,1)}
   ...
\endpsclip

An example of a SPECIAL section might look like this:

# BEGIN SPECIAL
\psclip{\psframe[linewidth=0, linestyle=none](0,0)(1,1)}
\psline[linewidth=1.2pt,linecolor=red]{<-}\physicscoor(2.83,2)\physicscoor(2.83,18)
\uput{4pt}[180]{0}\physicscoor(2.83,12){observed}
\psline[linewidth=0.8pt,linecolor=red,linestyle=dashed]\physicscoor( 3.17,0)\physicscoor( 3.17,28.14)
\psline[linewidth=0.8pt,linecolor=red,linestyle=dashed]\physicscoor(-3.59,0)\physicscoor(-3.59,28.14)
\endpsclip
# END SPECIAL